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A Game of Thrones (disambiguation)

A Game of Thrones is the first novel in George R. R. Martins fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire. A Game of Thrones or Game of Thrones may also refer to:

                                               

The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings is an epic high-fantasy novel written by English author and scholar J. R. R. Tolkien. The story began as a sequel to Tolkiens 1937 fantasy novel The Hobbit, but eventually dev...

                                               

Harry Potter (character)

Harry James Potter is the titular protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. The majority of the books plot covers seven years in the life of the orphan Harry, who, on his eleventh birthday...

                                               

Interest (emotion)

Interest is a feeling or emotion that causes attention to focus on an object, event, or process. In contemporary psychology of interest, the term is used as a general concept that may encompass oth...

                                               

The Simpsons

The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series is a satirical depiction of working-class life, epitomized by the Simpson family, w...

                                               

Perfume

Perfume is a mixture of fragrant essential oils or aroma compounds, fixatives and solvents, used to give the human body, animals, food, objects, and living-spaces an agreeable scent. It is usually ...

                                               

Batman

Batman is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character was created by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger, and first appeared in Detective Comics...

                                               

Peter Parker: Spider-Man

Peter Parker: Spider-Man originally titled simply Spider-Man, was a monthly comic book series published by Marvel Comics that ran for 98 issues from 1990 to 1998. The series was retitled Peter Park...

                                               

X-Men

X-Men are a team of fictional mutant superheroes appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by artist/co-writer Jack Kirby and writer Stan Lee, the characters first appea...

Interest
                                     

ⓘ Interest

Interest, in finance and economics, is payment from a borrower or deposit-taking financial institution to a lender or depositor of an amount above repayment of the principal sum, at a particular rate. It is distinct from a fee which the borrower may pay the lender or some third party. It is also distinct from dividend which is paid by a company to its shareholders from its profit or reserve, but not at a particular rate decided beforehand, rather on a pro rata basis as a share in the reward gained by risk taking entrepreneurs when the revenue earned exceeds the total costs.

For example, a customer would usually pay interest to borrow from a bank, so they pay the bank an amount which is more than the amount they borrowed, or a customer may earn interest on their savings, and so they may withdraw more than they originally deposited. In the case of savings, the customer is the lender, and the bank plays the role of the borrower.

Interest differs from profit, in that interest is received by a lender, whereas profit is received by the owner of an asset, investment or enterprise. Interest may be part or the whole of the profit on an investment, but the two concepts are distinct from each other from an accounting perspective.

The rate of interest is equal to the interest amount paid or received over a particular period divided by in principal sum borrowed or lent usually expressed as a percentage.

Compound interest means that interest is earned on prior interest in addition to the principal. Due to compounding, the total amount of debt grows exponentially, and its mathematical study led to the discovery of the number e. In practice, interest is most often calculated on a daily, monthly, or yearly basis, and its impact is influenced greatly by its compounding rate.